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Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, July 3, 2022
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A Matter of Importance

Dear Source:
Is it really fishing or the procedure towards the extinction of our marine organisms? In truth a well-sustained island begins at the root, with its reefs. Gillnetting is used to primarily catch cod, hake, Pollack, ling, flatfish and dogfish even though they not always catch their intended pray.
In my point of view gillnetting is not only reducing the amount of marine organisms but is also endangering us as humans. I say this because the corals are what anchor and sustain the island in place. Gillnetting not only kills small marine organisms but it also kills and is endangering turtles, an animal that is protected by the Act of Endangered Species. Gillnetting is a danger to all, People of our community have also been impacted by this technique as well. When fishermen got too close to snorkelers in an past event two snorkelers where dangerously close to becoming by catch on an Saturday morning.
Gill nets trap all kind of fish that are capable of fitting into the net even the unwanted ones. This is one of the most serious issues about this explosive form of fishing because some fish can not be eaten and or are not the pray they intended to get so they die. I believe that this should be illegal due to the facts that they are not only killing unwanted prey if not they are also endangering the corals that provide shelter and feeding grounds for other fishes.
However, the banning of gill and trammel net fishing in 2006 by Governor Turnbull should be enforced. I believe that with the enforcement of this law it will help sustain our fishery. The loss of our fishery will not only decrease the amount of marine organisms but it will also decrease the amount of tourist and sustainable lifestyles of our future generations.
What can we do as people who care about our environment and its future? We can make a statement and protest until the safety of our marine environmental ecosystem is preserved.
Shinell Johnson
St. Croix

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Dear Source:
Is it really fishing or the procedure towards the extinction of our marine organisms? In truth a well-sustained island begins at the root, with its reefs. Gillnetting is used to primarily catch cod, hake, Pollack, ling, flatfish and dogfish even though they not always catch their intended pray.
In my point of view gillnetting is not only reducing the amount of marine organisms but is also endangering us as humans. I say this because the corals are what anchor and sustain the island in place. Gillnetting not only kills small marine organisms but it also kills and is endangering turtles, an animal that is protected by the Act of Endangered Species. Gillnetting is a danger to all, People of our community have also been impacted by this technique as well. When fishermen got too close to snorkelers in an past event two snorkelers where dangerously close to becoming by catch on an Saturday morning.
Gill nets trap all kind of fish that are capable of fitting into the net even the unwanted ones. This is one of the most serious issues about this explosive form of fishing because some fish can not be eaten and or are not the pray they intended to get so they die. I believe that this should be illegal due to the facts that they are not only killing unwanted prey if not they are also endangering the corals that provide shelter and feeding grounds for other fishes.
However, the banning of gill and trammel net fishing in 2006 by Governor Turnbull should be enforced. I believe that with the enforcement of this law it will help sustain our fishery. The loss of our fishery will not only decrease the amount of marine organisms but it will also decrease the amount of tourist and sustainable lifestyles of our future generations.
What can we do as people who care about our environment and its future? We can make a statement and protest until the safety of our marine environmental ecosystem is preserved.
Shinell Johnson
St. Croix

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.