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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, July 1, 2022
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Overrun with Iguanas

Dear Source:
I read that iguanas are carriers of staph infections when kept as pets. I know that many homeowners on St. John feed them, and the Westin feeds them. Jack Dammon from Fish and Wildlife, in the 1980's would rescue eggs from St. Thomas that were from injured females; that was probably our source for the population boom we have today.
My theory is that we have removed native habitat and provided imported ornamentals in our yards which allows them to thrive. There are no natural enemies and that we are encouraging to propagate by hand feeding them.
The droppings are enormous and pollute pools and hot tubs, decks and cars. They are a nightmare for me, eating all my bougainvillea, orchids (except native orchids), hibiscus and herbs.
I am considering adopting two cats from the Animal Center to deal with our exploding population!

Irene Patton
Great Cruz Bay, St. John

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Dear Source:
I read that iguanas are carriers of staph infections when kept as pets. I know that many homeowners on St. John feed them, and the Westin feeds them. Jack Dammon from Fish and Wildlife, in the 1980's would rescue eggs from St. Thomas that were from injured females; that was probably our source for the population boom we have today.
My theory is that we have removed native habitat and provided imported ornamentals in our yards which allows them to thrive. There are no natural enemies and that we are encouraging to propagate by hand feeding them.
The droppings are enormous and pollute pools and hot tubs, decks and cars. They are a nightmare for me, eating all my bougainvillea, orchids (except native orchids), hibiscus and herbs.
I am considering adopting two cats from the Animal Center to deal with our exploding population!

Irene Patton
Great Cruz Bay, St. John

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.