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Youth Rule During V.I. Carnival Children’s Parade

April 27, 2007 — Friday morning, the V.I. Carnival Committee presented its Children’s Parade, as youth ruled downtown Charlotte Amalie with dazzling presentations and artful costumes.
Grand Marshall for the parade was Patricia Thomas, who was doing double duty – she is also the founder of the St. Thomas Majorettes, marking their second year of activity.
“Oh, I feel great,” she beamed, when asked how she was enjoying the honor. “It is wonderful, I love Carnival. I’ve been participating for 38 years. I was twirling from the age of six.”
On the other side of the spectrum, the Sebastien’s Majorettes set the standard many years ago and is still going strong. Dressed in gold and royal blue sequins, the Sebastien’s Majorettes are celebrating 50 years and have developed a program that leads to scholarship opportunities on the national level for its participants.
Mother of Carnival Prince Jahmalikye M. Lee Richardson, 105-Jamz radio personality Christina Lee (Reds de Realist), said that being the mother of a mini-celebrity is a learning experience. “It has been eye-opening. I’ve always been a spectator at these events for Carnival, but I got to see how much work and effort people who are involved in it have to put in,” she said.
Lt. Gov. Gregory Francis was a man on the move, strolling between the Grand Hotel Square and Lionel Roberts Stadium, greeting friends and associates along the way. “Since it’s the 55 year anniversary, it’s a large crowd and it’s nice,” Francis said.
He also wanted to deliver a message. “We have to focus on the children. We have to get back to the basics of respect,” he said. “I was brought up into a family of love and religion. We cannot assume that the children know what’s going on. Everyone used to be involved in raising a child. Let’s get back to the basics of bringing up our children.”
Four-year resident Maria Macariola was there with her three children, Karina, James and Christina. “This is our second time. The first time we did it, it they were little, and it was kind of hard … but now that they’re bigger I want them to experience the Carnival.”
Debbie Cheney came from Pennsylvania to visit her sister, specifically to take in V.I. Carnival. She said, “This is exciting. I’ve been hearing about it for the last four years.”
Senior citizens and persons with disabilities had their own viewing stand, and Clarence Scipio ensures that they are looked after each year. When asked how long he had been attending to these special guests, he laughed and said, “According to (radio personality) Addie Ottley, ‘umpteen years!’” Scipio and his support staff will have an even larger contingent to serve for the Adults’ Parade on Saturday.
Offering CDs for sale along the route was businessman and musician Glen Mason (Infinite Love). After years out of the limelight, his “She Doh Wan Yo” warns against investing too heavily in a partner who, to put it plainly, just isn’t that into you. Glen said, “It touched a nerve. Woman like it and man like it … if you can laugh about the truth, that’s a healing process right there.”
Local businesswoman Beth Benta said, smiling, “It’s my favorite part of Carnival – I love the Children’s Parade and I love all the costumes.”
Benta had brought along her own mini-troupe: children Jaden, Jordan, David and her sister, Jane Polley from Boston. Polley was especially intrigued with the steel bands, saying, “We love it, it’s terrific!” as the Superior Court Rising Stars made their way up the road.
The on-time start may have surprised some entrants and resulted in a few gaps along the way. Parade Marshall Bernard Birmingham was working hard to keep things moving. “Hopefully, it’s the best Carnival yet! But if you’re not there on time, we will move without you and when you come you’ll go to the end of the line.”
There were 38 entries in all, concluding with the customary appearance of the Traditional Indians shortly before 3 p.m.
The Adults’ Parade is scheduled to begin Saturday at 10 a.m. with 53 entries noted at press time. Saturday night all are invited back to the village for Milo’s Kings followed by the fireworks display dedicated to the men and women of the V.I. National Guard, the Calypso Spektakula and Small Axe Band for Last Lap.
To review the day in pictures click here.
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April 27, 2007 -- Friday morning, the V.I. Carnival Committee presented its Children’s Parade, as youth ruled downtown Charlotte Amalie with dazzling presentations and artful costumes.
Grand Marshall for the parade was Patricia Thomas, who was doing double duty – she is also the founder of the St. Thomas Majorettes, marking their second year of activity.
“Oh, I feel great,” she beamed, when asked how she was enjoying the honor. “It is wonderful, I love Carnival. I’ve been participating for 38 years. I was twirling from the age of six.”
On the other side of the spectrum, the Sebastien’s Majorettes set the standard many years ago and is still going strong. Dressed in gold and royal blue sequins, the Sebastien’s Majorettes are celebrating 50 years and have developed a program that leads to scholarship opportunities on the national level for its participants.
Mother of Carnival Prince Jahmalikye M. Lee Richardson, 105-Jamz radio personality Christina Lee (Reds de Realist), said that being the mother of a mini-celebrity is a learning experience. “It has been eye-opening. I’ve always been a spectator at these events for Carnival, but I got to see how much work and effort people who are involved in it have to put in,” she said.
Lt. Gov. Gregory Francis was a man on the move, strolling between the Grand Hotel Square and Lionel Roberts Stadium, greeting friends and associates along the way. “Since it’s the 55 year anniversary, it’s a large crowd and it’s nice,” Francis said.
He also wanted to deliver a message. “We have to focus on the children. We have to get back to the basics of respect,” he said. “I was brought up into a family of love and religion. We cannot assume that the children know what’s going on. Everyone used to be involved in raising a child. Let’s get back to the basics of bringing up our children.”
Four-year resident Maria Macariola was there with her three children, Karina, James and Christina. “This is our second time. The first time we did it, it they were little, and it was kind of hard … but now that they’re bigger I want them to experience the Carnival.”
Debbie Cheney came from Pennsylvania to visit her sister, specifically to take in V.I. Carnival. She said, “This is exciting. I’ve been hearing about it for the last four years.”
Senior citizens and persons with disabilities had their own viewing stand, and Clarence Scipio ensures that they are looked after each year. When asked how long he had been attending to these special guests, he laughed and said, “According to (radio personality) Addie Ottley, ‘umpteen years!’” Scipio and his support staff will have an even larger contingent to serve for the Adults’ Parade on Saturday.
Offering CDs for sale along the route was businessman and musician Glen Mason (Infinite Love). After years out of the limelight, his “She Doh Wan Yo” warns against investing too heavily in a partner who, to put it plainly, just isn’t that into you. Glen said, “It touched a nerve. Woman like it and man like it … if you can laugh about the truth, that’s a healing process right there.”
Local businesswoman Beth Benta said, smiling, “It’s my favorite part of Carnival – I love the Children’s Parade and I love all the costumes.”
Benta had brought along her own mini-troupe: children Jaden, Jordan, David and her sister, Jane Polley from Boston. Polley was especially intrigued with the steel bands, saying, “We love it, it’s terrific!” as the Superior Court Rising Stars made their way up the road.
The on-time start may have surprised some entrants and resulted in a few gaps along the way. Parade Marshall Bernard Birmingham was working hard to keep things moving. “Hopefully, it’s the best Carnival yet! But if you’re not there on time, we will move without you and when you come you’ll go to the end of the line.”
There were 38 entries in all, concluding with the customary appearance of the Traditional Indians shortly before 3 p.m.
The Adults’ Parade is scheduled to begin Saturday at 10 a.m. with 53 entries noted at press time. Saturday night all are invited back to the village for Milo’s Kings followed by the fireworks display dedicated to the men and women of the V.I. National Guard, the Calypso Spektakula and Small Axe Band for Last Lap.
To review the day in pictures click here.
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.