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HomeNewsArchivesLandmarks Society Auction Draws More Than 200 People

Landmarks Society Auction Draws More Than 200 People

April 9, 2006 — More than 200 people gathered in tents on the grounds of the Whim Museum Sunday as the St. Croix Landmarks Society had its 23rd antiques auction.
Organizer Robert White said this is the biggest single-event fundraiser for the society. The money is used to maintain the grounds at Whim and also is assists in its educational programs.
Auctioneer Jeff Jeffers from Delaware, Ohio, bantered and joked with the audience as he disposed of about 170 items during the afternoon.
The auction featured West Indian, American and Colonial furniture, reproductions, collectibles and lots of "smalls."
White said that the diversity of the items made it possible for anyone at any income level to take something home.
As he watched the activity from a chair outside the tent, he gave thanks for the beautiful weather and explained that some items are donated to the society, but most are sold for the owner with the society receiving a 30 percent commission on the sale.
In previous years gross sales have been around $350,000 with the society earning about $100,000.
Although most of the people were attracted to the action in the tents, there was also a small flea market and refreshment booths.
Youngsters spread out over the grounds and made up their own amusements.
White, who was a society board member for almost 16 years and former vice president, said this is the largest auction of antique furniture in the Antilles islands.
He added that funds from the auction had also helped the society establish one of the most extensive collections of genealogical research materials. He urged residents who have documents relating to family research to donate them to the society.
Co-chairing the auction committee with White was Sylvia Brady.
Items in the auction included a large Danish bookcase with glass doors, circa 1830; a lock box, circa 1600; postcards and photos from 1899; a Crucian mahogany candle stand from the late 1800s; and paintings of dogs and cats from the early 1900s.
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April 9, 2006 -- More than 200 people gathered in tents on the grounds of the Whim Museum Sunday as the St. Croix Landmarks Society had its 23rd antiques auction.
Organizer Robert White said this is the biggest single-event fundraiser for the society. The money is used to maintain the grounds at Whim and also is assists in its educational programs.
Auctioneer Jeff Jeffers from Delaware, Ohio, bantered and joked with the audience as he disposed of about 170 items during the afternoon.
The auction featured West Indian, American and Colonial furniture, reproductions, collectibles and lots of "smalls."
White said that the diversity of the items made it possible for anyone at any income level to take something home.
As he watched the activity from a chair outside the tent, he gave thanks for the beautiful weather and explained that some items are donated to the society, but most are sold for the owner with the society receiving a 30 percent commission on the sale.
In previous years gross sales have been around $350,000 with the society earning about $100,000.
Although most of the people were attracted to the action in the tents, there was also a small flea market and refreshment booths.
Youngsters spread out over the grounds and made up their own amusements.
White, who was a society board member for almost 16 years and former vice president, said this is the largest auction of antique furniture in the Antilles islands.
He added that funds from the auction had also helped the society establish one of the most extensive collections of genealogical research materials. He urged residents who have documents relating to family research to donate them to the society.
Co-chairing the auction committee with White was Sylvia Brady.
Items in the auction included a large Danish bookcase with glass doors, circa 1830; a lock box, circa 1600; postcards and photos from 1899; a Crucian mahogany candle stand from the late 1800s; and paintings of dogs and cats from the early 1900s.
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.