80.3 F
Charlotte Amalie
Monday, July 4, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesDowe Testifies He Did Not Tell Accountant to Pay Him $103,000

Dowe Testifies He Did Not Tell Accountant to Pay Him $103,000

Oct. 3, 2005 – The defense rested its case Monday in the wire fraud trial of ex-Sen. Carlton Dowe, who contradicted a prosecution witness' testimony by saying he never instructed the Fire Services accountant to pay him $103,000.
Dowe, 48, was charged in August 2004 with two counts of wire fraud for allegedly over-billing the Virgin Islands government more than $75,000 in 2001. Dowe testified Friday and said he was innocent. (See "Dowe Says He Is Innocent As He Takes the Stand Friday".)
Dowe, a former Fire Services director, said he did not know beforehand how much money he would receive and simply accepted the amount former fire accountant Rosalie Corcino said was due to him for back pay.
Corcino testified last week that Dowe came to her repeatedly, telling her how to add raises due to him because he achieved college degrees in his field. Those raises are called career-incentive pay.
At question is whether Dowe's $50,000 settlement of a suit against the government in 1999 for extra pay excluded him from collecting the career-incentive pay.
Dowe, who maintains he was entitled to career incentive from as far back as 1991, said prosecutors and government inspectors were trying to trap him.
"I told them repeatedly, you bring your accountant and I will bring mine," Dowe said. "There came a point in time where it was apparent to me Mr. (Nicholas) Peru had no interest in the truth." Peru is an investigator with the V.I. Inspector General's Office.
Monday's hearing ended with Judge Raymond Finch instructing the jury on how to deliberate the evidence and what was necessary for them to find Dowe innocent or guilty.
If convicted, Dowe could face 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
Closing arguments are scheduled for Tuesday.

Back Talk

Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,757FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
17 hours ago
Virgin Islands Source

Host Adisha Penn recaps the biggest headlines of the week while Source reporter Knema Willett joins USVI Division of Festivals Director Ian Turnbull in the studio for some behind-the-scenes info on the 2022 St. John Celebration. ... See MoreSee Less

Load more
Oct. 3, 2005 - The defense rested its case Monday in the wire fraud trial of ex-Sen. Carlton Dowe, who contradicted a prosecution witness' testimony by saying he never instructed the Fire Services accountant to pay him $103,000.
Dowe, 48, was charged in August 2004 with two counts of wire fraud for allegedly over-billing the Virgin Islands government more than $75,000 in 2001. Dowe testified Friday and said he was innocent. (See "Dowe Says He Is Innocent As He Takes the Stand Friday".)
Dowe, a former Fire Services director, said he did not know beforehand how much money he would receive and simply accepted the amount former fire accountant Rosalie Corcino said was due to him for back pay.
Corcino testified last week that Dowe came to her repeatedly, telling her how to add raises due to him because he achieved college degrees in his field. Those raises are called career-incentive pay.
At question is whether Dowe's $50,000 settlement of a suit against the government in 1999 for extra pay excluded him from collecting the career-incentive pay.
Dowe, who maintains he was entitled to career incentive from as far back as 1991, said prosecutors and government inspectors were trying to trap him.
"I told them repeatedly, you bring your accountant and I will bring mine," Dowe said. "There came a point in time where it was apparent to me Mr. (Nicholas) Peru had no interest in the truth." Peru is an investigator with the V.I. Inspector General's Office.
Monday's hearing ended with Judge Raymond Finch instructing the jury on how to deliberate the evidence and what was necessary for them to find Dowe innocent or guilty.
If convicted, Dowe could face 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
Closing arguments are scheduled for Tuesday.

Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.