83.9 F
Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, June 29, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesPreservation Award Given to St. Thomas Synagogue

Preservation Award Given to St. Thomas Synagogue

Oct. 2, 2004 – The National Trust for Historic Preservation presented the St. Thomas Synagogue its prestigious National Preservation Honor Award in a ceremony held Sept. 30. The synagogue was one of 22 national award winners honored by the National Trust at its week-long 2004 National Preservation Conference in Louisville, Ky. See "Synagogue Earns National Award for Restoration").
In English, the Synagogue of B’racha V’shalom U’gmilut Chasadim translates to the Synagogue of Blessings and Peace and Loving Deeds. Founded in 1796, twice destroyed by fires and rebuilt in 1833, the St. Thomas Synagogue has become a community landmark. This Sephardic synagogue is the third oldest synagogue in the Western Hemisphere and the oldest in continuous use under the American flag. Through earthquakes and hurricanes, the synagogue has sheltered 170 years of worship services to the community. With the exception of the day that St. Thomas was devastated by Hurricane Marilyn, the synagogue has held a service on every Sabbath since 1833, according to a release from the National Trust.
"The restoration efforts of the St. Thomas Synagogue community are inspirational," said Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. "It is great to see a community come together to preserve such an important and beautiful historic landmark."
Co-nominees honored for the restoration of St. Thomas Synagogue were the Hebrew congregation of the St. Thomas Synagogue and St. Croix architect William A. Taylor.
The National Preservation Honor Awards are bestowed on distinguished individuals, nonprofit organizations, public agencies and corporations whose skill and determination have given new meaning to their communities through preservation of our architectural and cultural heritage.
For more information on the Trust or the St. Thomas Synagogue's award, go to the Trust's Web site, www.nationaltrust.org.
Back Talk

Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Publisher's note: Like the St. Thomas Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much–and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice… click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,759FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Oct. 2, 2004 – The National Trust for Historic Preservation presented the St. Thomas Synagogue its prestigious National Preservation Honor Award in a ceremony held Sept. 30. The synagogue was one of 22 national award winners honored by the National Trust at its week-long 2004 National Preservation Conference in Louisville, Ky. See "Synagogue Earns National Award for Restoration").
In English, the Synagogue of B’racha V’shalom U’gmilut Chasadim translates to the Synagogue of Blessings and Peace and Loving Deeds. Founded in 1796, twice destroyed by fires and rebuilt in 1833, the St. Thomas Synagogue has become a community landmark. This Sephardic synagogue is the third oldest synagogue in the Western Hemisphere and the oldest in continuous use under the American flag. Through earthquakes and hurricanes, the synagogue has sheltered 170 years of worship services to the community. With the exception of the day that St. Thomas was devastated by Hurricane Marilyn, the synagogue has held a service on every Sabbath since 1833, according to a release from the National Trust.
"The restoration efforts of the St. Thomas Synagogue community are inspirational," said Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. "It is great to see a community come together to preserve such an important and beautiful historic landmark."
Co-nominees honored for the restoration of St. Thomas Synagogue were the Hebrew congregation of the St. Thomas Synagogue and St. Croix architect William A. Taylor.
The National Preservation Honor Awards are bestowed on distinguished individuals, nonprofit organizations, public agencies and corporations whose skill and determination have given new meaning to their communities through preservation of our architectural and cultural heritage.
For more information on the Trust or the St. Thomas Synagogue's award, go to the Trust's Web site, www.nationaltrust.org.
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Publisher's note: Like the St. Thomas Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much--and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice... click here.