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HomeNewsArchives'UNMANLY' QUICHE CAN BE A TASTE TREAT FOR MOM

'UNMANLY' QUICHE CAN BE A TASTE TREAT FOR MOM

May 11, 2003 – There's a not-so-old saying that "real men don't eat quiche." Light, fluffy and not so filling, this creamy egg- and cheese-based dish does seem to be more of a "feminine" food.
Quiche is easy to make and delicious to eat, though, and while it's too late to whip one up for Mother's Day this year, chances are Mom would appreciate and enjoy another day off from the kitchen, should others in her family want to give this recipe a try.
A classic of French cuisine, the savory dish actually originated in Germany. Specifically, it was born in the medieval kingdom of Lothringen, under German rule, a region the French later renamed Lorraine. The word quiche comes from the German word Küchen, meaning "cake."
The original quiche Lorraine was an open pie with a filling consisting of an egg-and-cream custard with smoked bacon. It was only later that cheese, Swiss cheese to be exact, was added to the dish. The bottom crust was originally made from bread dough, but that has long since evolved into a short-crust, puff pastry or even phyllo dough bottom.
Quiche became popular in England after World War II and in the United States during the 1950s. Because of its primarily vegetarian ingredients, it was somehow considered an "unmanly" dish.
Today, one can find many varieties of quiche, some containing broccoli, mushrooms, ham and/or seafood such as smoked salmon or shrimp.
You can even cook up a West Indian-style quiche with flaked saltfish, crab or lobster and fresh local herbs such as basil, thyme or rosemary. Try adding some locally grown eggplant as well. Quiche can be served as an entrée for lunch or dinner, along with a green salad and fruit for dessert. Or, it makes a scrumptious basic for brunch in bed for Mom on Mother's Day or any day.
Classic Quiche
Crust:
1/2 of an 8-oz. package of phyllo dough sheets (available in the frozen food section, near the pastry crusts)
Quiche:
8 slices bacon, crisply cooked and crumbled
1 cup (4 oz.) shredded Swiss cheese
1/3 cup finely chopped onion
4 eggs
2 cups heavy cream
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Place phyllo dough sheets over the bottom and up the sides of a round baking dish or quiche pan. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion on top.
Beat eggs slightly. Beat in remaining ingredients. Pour into dish. Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake about 30 minutes longer or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.
Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 300 calories, 25 gms fat (71 percent fat calories), 125 mg cholesterol, 256 mg sodium.

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May 11, 2003 - There's a not-so-old saying that "real men don't eat quiche." Light, fluffy and not so filling, this creamy egg- and cheese-based dish does seem to be more of a "feminine" food.
Quiche is easy to make and delicious to eat, though, and while it's too late to whip one up for Mother's Day this year, chances are Mom would appreciate and enjoy another day off from the kitchen, should others in her family want to give this recipe a try.
A classic of French cuisine, the savory dish actually originated in Germany. Specifically, it was born in the medieval kingdom of Lothringen, under German rule, a region the French later renamed Lorraine. The word quiche comes from the German word Küchen, meaning "cake."
The original quiche Lorraine was an open pie with a filling consisting of an egg-and-cream custard with smoked bacon. It was only later that cheese, Swiss cheese to be exact, was added to the dish. The bottom crust was originally made from bread dough, but that has long since evolved into a short-crust, puff pastry or even phyllo dough bottom.
Quiche became popular in England after World War II and in the United States during the 1950s. Because of its primarily vegetarian ingredients, it was somehow considered an "unmanly" dish.
Today, one can find many varieties of quiche, some containing broccoli, mushrooms, ham and/or seafood such as smoked salmon or shrimp.
You can even cook up a West Indian-style quiche with flaked saltfish, crab or lobster and fresh local herbs such as basil, thyme or rosemary. Try adding some locally grown eggplant as well. Quiche can be served as an entrée for lunch or dinner, along with a green salad and fruit for dessert. Or, it makes a scrumptious basic for brunch in bed for Mom on Mother's Day or any day.
Classic Quiche
Crust:
1/2 of an 8-oz. package of phyllo dough sheets (available in the frozen food section, near the pastry crusts)
Quiche:
8 slices bacon, crisply cooked and crumbled
1 cup (4 oz.) shredded Swiss cheese
1/3 cup finely chopped onion
4 eggs
2 cups heavy cream
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Place phyllo dough sheets over the bottom and up the sides of a round baking dish or quiche pan. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion on top.
Beat eggs slightly. Beat in remaining ingredients. Pour into dish. Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake about 30 minutes longer or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.
Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 300 calories, 25 gms fat (71 percent fat calories), 125 mg cholesterol, 256 mg sodium.

Publisher's note : Like the St. John Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.