82.1 F
Charlotte Amalie
Friday, July 1, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesPARK PLAN TO REDUCE WILD HOG POPULATION READY

PARK PLAN TO REDUCE WILD HOG POPULATION READY

April 21, 2003 – The V.I. National Park has finalized its plan to reduce the number of roaming wild hogs that call the park home.
"The program is termed a sustained reduction because once the hog populations are reduced to low levels, the smaller populations will be held at or below that level," Rafe Boulon, the park's chief of resources management, said in a release.
Phase 1 of the plan calls for contracting the work of building fences and live traps to keep non-native species including the hogs from areas that will be monitored and from places notorious for hog activity. Those places include Herman Farm, Catherineberg and L'Esperance. This phase is expected to take a year.
Phase 2 involves reducing the hog population by capturing the animals in snares or traps. Dogs or guns will be used only for animals that are hard to capture. Areas with lots of hogs will see the first activity, and local volunteers will assist contractors. This should take two to three years.
In Phase 3, park personnel will look for signs of hog activity. When it is found, the park will trap or humanely shoot the animals.
Boulon said park authorities worked for a year on formulating the plan, which recently received final approval from the National Park Service Southeast Region office.
The hog reduction program is part of the park's ongoing efforts to rid or reduce non-native species, also including rats, cats, mongoose, goats and sheep.
Boulon could not be reached for additional comment.

Publisher's note : Like the St. John Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much — and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice … click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,756FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
April 21, 2003 - The V.I. National Park has finalized its plan to reduce the number of roaming wild hogs that call the park home.
"The program is termed a sustained reduction because once the hog populations are reduced to low levels, the smaller populations will be held at or below that level," Rafe Boulon, the park's chief of resources management, said in a release.
Phase 1 of the plan calls for contracting the work of building fences and live traps to keep non-native species including the hogs from areas that will be monitored and from places notorious for hog activity. Those places include Herman Farm, Catherineberg and L'Esperance. This phase is expected to take a year.
Phase 2 involves reducing the hog population by capturing the animals in snares or traps. Dogs or guns will be used only for animals that are hard to capture. Areas with lots of hogs will see the first activity, and local volunteers will assist contractors. This should take two to three years.
In Phase 3, park personnel will look for signs of hog activity. When it is found, the park will trap or humanely shoot the animals.
Boulon said park authorities worked for a year on formulating the plan, which recently received final approval from the National Park Service Southeast Region office.
The hog reduction program is part of the park's ongoing efforts to rid or reduce non-native species, also including rats, cats, mongoose, goats and sheep.
Boulon could not be reached for additional comment.

Publisher's note : Like the St. John Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.