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HomeNewsArchivesLOCAL SHRINE GROUP HELPS KIDS GET MEDICAL CARE

LOCAL SHRINE GROUP HELPS KIDS GET MEDICAL CARE

Nov. 4, 2002 – Scores of children with orthopedic problems got treatment at the Ingeborg Nesbitt Clinic in Frederiksted on Friday, thanks to the St. Croix Shrine Club.
Twice yearly the club brings down a battalion of doctors, nurses and specialists to help youngsters with physical difficulties from bone disorders or burns. The function of the club, according to Dr. Philip Petachenko, a member, is to provide money for the children's transportation to one of the Shrine's stateside orthopedic hospitals or burn centers for medical care.
"People who have a child who needs orthopedic care or has burn problems should contact us," Petachenko said. "There is no charge for any of our services, and there are no racial or background barriers. All we care about are the kids."
A team of three doctors, three nurses and two orthopedic specialists came to the region last week from the Shriners Hospital in Springfield, Massachusetts, to help treat patients with a range of problems including muscular dystrophy, scoliosis and cerebral palsy.
Shriner Bill Watkins, like Petachenko, was a founder of the St. Croix Shrine Club 25 years ago. Watkins said more than 268 children have been helped through the club and that many of Friday's young patients had been to Springfield several times for treatment.
There are 22 Shriners hospitals throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Kids ages 6 to 18 are eligible to apply for treatment, Watkins said, and those accepted may receive health care up to age 21. "We will accept any child if it's something we can help," he said.
Watkins said treatment and/or transportation costs patients nothing. He said an annual dance at the St. George Village Botanical Garden helps foot part of the bill, and donations of frequent-flyer miles from American Airlines help with the travel.
Some of the young patients "have to see a doctor every six months," Watkins said, "and some have been to the hospital several times."
The Springfield medical team visited St. Thomas on Thursday and St. Croix on Friday; it's also visiting Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic before returning to Massachusetts.
"We need the public to be aware of what we do," Petachenko said. "We just want to help."
For information about applying to the St. Croix Shrine Club for assistance, call Grady Thurman at 773-9437.

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Nov. 4, 2002 - Scores of children with orthopedic problems got treatment at the Ingeborg Nesbitt Clinic in Frederiksted on Friday, thanks to the St. Croix Shrine Club.
Twice yearly the club brings down a battalion of doctors, nurses and specialists to help youngsters with physical difficulties from bone disorders or burns. The function of the club, according to Dr. Philip Petachenko, a member, is to provide money for the children's transportation to one of the Shrine's stateside orthopedic hospitals or burn centers for medical care.
"People who have a child who needs orthopedic care or has burn problems should contact us," Petachenko said. "There is no charge for any of our services, and there are no racial or background barriers. All we care about are the kids."
A team of three doctors, three nurses and two orthopedic specialists came to the region last week from the Shriners Hospital in Springfield, Massachusetts, to help treat patients with a range of problems including muscular dystrophy, scoliosis and cerebral palsy.
Shriner Bill Watkins, like Petachenko, was a founder of the St. Croix Shrine Club 25 years ago. Watkins said more than 268 children have been helped through the club and that many of Friday's young patients had been to Springfield several times for treatment.
There are 22 Shriners hospitals throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Kids ages 6 to 18 are eligible to apply for treatment, Watkins said, and those accepted may receive health care up to age 21. "We will accept any child if it's something we can help," he said.
Watkins said treatment and/or transportation costs patients nothing. He said an annual dance at the St. George Village Botanical Garden helps foot part of the bill, and donations of frequent-flyer miles from American Airlines help with the travel.
Some of the young patients "have to see a doctor every six months," Watkins said, "and some have been to the hospital several times."
The Springfield medical team visited St. Thomas on Thursday and St. Croix on Friday; it's also visiting Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic before returning to Massachusetts.
"We need the public to be aware of what we do," Petachenko said. "We just want to help."
For information about applying to the St. Croix Shrine Club for assistance, call Grady Thurman at 773-9437.

Publisher's note : Like the St. Croix Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.