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HomeNewsArchivesRELAY FOR LIFE RAISES CANCER AWARENESS, FUNDS

RELAY FOR LIFE RAISES CANCER AWARENESS, FUNDS

Oct. 13, 2002 – More than 1,000 eager walkers and runners hit the tarp and wore down the soles of their sneakers at the St. Croix Educational Complex for the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life, raising approximately $35,000 by the 2 p.m. closing ceremony. This year's theme was "Walking for a Cure."
Relay for Life is a nationwide activity for the American Cancer Society and is used to support a variety of programs, including cancer awareness programs and paraphernalia, research and off-island travel for treatment.
The race was not a competition but an opportunity to raise community awareness for the plight of cancer patients and their families. Cancer patients and survivors were encouraged to continue to walk, stroll and roll for a cure.
Aubrey Brown, who does public relations for the event, said 30 survivors in lime-green T-shirts and pink baseball caps led the opening procession that began the 24-hour event.
Five-year breast cancer survivor Paula Broadnax, owner of Inn Paradise, said she returned from her travels on the mainland for the event in support of a friend she met in a group meeting.
Her friend, Estelle Torres, has survived colon cancer for 18 months. Torres urged both men and women to get screened for breast, colon and cervical cancer. "I'm just too happy to be alive," she said.
Marthious Clavier, a 2002 UVI graduate, said he walked with his mother, who is a cancer survivor." I lost my grandmother 10 years ago," he said
Different organizations and community groups formed teams, solicited pledges and walked in the relay. Funds were also raised through the sale of T-shirts.
Event coordinator Vivian Furet said the heavy rains on Friday led to some cancellations.
But St. Croix chapter President Daphne Lewis said, "Rain or shine we were going to be here."
Some of the teams participating were Alpha Kappa Alpha and Delta Sigma Theta sororities, University of the Virgin Islands, Gentlemen of Jones, Rotary Clubs, Legal Services of the Virgin Islands and the United States Postal Service.
Employees from the Puerto Rico Veterans Administration Hospital joined The St. Croix Veteran's Center for the event.
"The money raised stays on St. Croix," said Eleanor Johannes, team registrant. "The largest single donation of about $7,500 was donated by WAPA." WAPA also mounted a curtain draped poster memorial to former employee Claire Nesbitt, who died July 31.
"Each team was required to raise $1500 and pay a $150 entrant fee," Johannes said.
Scheduled activities included a luminary ceremony, a pajama jam, an aerobics class and gospel music. Health screenings were also offered by the American Red Cross.
"We all know someone who either has cancer or died from cancer," said Sgt. Major Eugenie Santos, coordinator for the V.I. National Guard's team, who tied with WAPA for first place with the largest team participation. "It was outstanding to see the support of the persons who came out and looked for nothing in return," Santos said
WAPA Liqui-lites also won the clear blue acrylic "star" award for the best decorated tent which came complete with a generator, television and VCR and also offered a full menu for each meal. Early Sunday morning, walkers took a break to watch Eddie Murphy's Nutty Professor.
Other awards included the longest walker, which went to the Honda Club. Dr. Marlon Williams ran 25 miles.
Wallace Williams of V.I. Pace Runners completed 20 miles, running two miles each hour, and Jo Shim of the Frederiksted Health Center and Friends did a run-walk combination for 30 miles.
"I participated because I think it is so important to raise funds for cancer care in the Virgin Islands because funds are limited," said Shim who also operates the HIV/AIDS clinic.

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Oct. 13, 2002 – More than 1,000 eager walkers and runners hit the tarp and wore down the soles of their sneakers at the St. Croix Educational Complex for the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life, raising approximately $35,000 by the 2 p.m. closing ceremony. This year's theme was "Walking for a Cure."
Relay for Life is a nationwide activity for the American Cancer Society and is used to support a variety of programs, including cancer awareness programs and paraphernalia, research and off-island travel for treatment.
The race was not a competition but an opportunity to raise community awareness for the plight of cancer patients and their families. Cancer patients and survivors were encouraged to continue to walk, stroll and roll for a cure.
Aubrey Brown, who does public relations for the event, said 30 survivors in lime-green T-shirts and pink baseball caps led the opening procession that began the 24-hour event.
Five-year breast cancer survivor Paula Broadnax, owner of Inn Paradise, said she returned from her travels on the mainland for the event in support of a friend she met in a group meeting.
Her friend, Estelle Torres, has survived colon cancer for 18 months. Torres urged both men and women to get screened for breast, colon and cervical cancer. "I'm just too happy to be alive," she said.
Marthious Clavier, a 2002 UVI graduate, said he walked with his mother, who is a cancer survivor." I lost my grandmother 10 years ago," he said
Different organizations and community groups formed teams, solicited pledges and walked in the relay. Funds were also raised through the sale of T-shirts.
Event coordinator Vivian Furet said the heavy rains on Friday led to some cancellations.
But St. Croix chapter President Daphne Lewis said, "Rain or shine we were going to be here."
Some of the teams participating were Alpha Kappa Alpha and Delta Sigma Theta sororities, University of the Virgin Islands, Gentlemen of Jones, Rotary Clubs, Legal Services of the Virgin Islands and the United States Postal Service.
Employees from the Puerto Rico Veterans Administration Hospital joined The St. Croix Veteran's Center for the event.
"The money raised stays on St. Croix," said Eleanor Johannes, team registrant. "The largest single donation of about $7,500 was donated by WAPA." WAPA also mounted a curtain draped poster memorial to former employee Claire Nesbitt, who died July 31.
"Each team was required to raise $1500 and pay a $150 entrant fee," Johannes said.
Scheduled activities included a luminary ceremony, a pajama jam, an aerobics class and gospel music. Health screenings were also offered by the American Red Cross.
"We all know someone who either has cancer or died from cancer," said Sgt. Major Eugenie Santos, coordinator for the V.I. National Guard's team, who tied with WAPA for first place with the largest team participation. "It was outstanding to see the support of the persons who came out and looked for nothing in return," Santos said
WAPA Liqui-lites also won the clear blue acrylic "star" award for the best decorated tent which came complete with a generator, television and VCR and also offered a full menu for each meal. Early Sunday morning, walkers took a break to watch Eddie Murphy's Nutty Professor.
Other awards included the longest walker, which went to the Honda Club. Dr. Marlon Williams ran 25 miles.
Wallace Williams of V.I. Pace Runners completed 20 miles, running two miles each hour, and Jo Shim of the Frederiksted Health Center and Friends did a run-walk combination for 30 miles.
"I participated because I think it is so important to raise funds for cancer care in the Virgin Islands because funds are limited," said Shim who also operates the HIV/AIDS clinic.

Publisher's note : Like the St. Croix Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.