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HomeNewsArchives'FRONT-ROW SEAT' AWAITS CORI MILLS IN D.C.

'FRONT-ROW SEAT' AWAITS CORI MILLS IN D.C.

Nov. 27, 2001 – Corinne Mills, a junior at All Saints Cathedral School, will be spending a week in the nation's capital early next year taking part in a program designed to give young people a close-up introduction to how the federal government works.
As a Presidential Classroom participant, she will attend seminars led by officials from each of the three branches of the federal government, the military, the media and other centers of power. With other students from throughout the United States and abroad, she'll get to take part in small-group workshops, tour the White House, attend a CIA briefing, observe congressional meetings and take part in a student mock presidential election.
Cori, the daughter of Catherine and Don Mills, is president of the All Saints Student Government Association, a member of the National Honor Society, and a member of the All Saints girls' varsity volleyball team. She will be in Washington, D.C., from Jan. 26 through Feb. 2.
The not-for-profit Presidential Classroom program, now in its 34th year, is open to high school juniors and seniors who have at least a 3.0 grade-point average on a 4-point system. More than 92,000 high school students from the United States and abroad have taken part in its offerings — which today include sessions focusing on global business, e-commerce and public policy; media and democracy; science, technology and public policy; and law and justice in a democracy, along with an international Future World Leaders Summit.
The program offers students "a front-row seat" for observing the American political process at work, Jay Wickliff, Presidential Classroom executive director, says. "In learning about the federal government and discussing key issues with Washington policymakers, our presidential scholars graduate with a better understanding of their civic responsibility." To learn more about the program, visit the Presidential Classroom web site.

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Nov. 27, 2001 - Corinne Mills, a junior at All Saints Cathedral School, will be spending a week in the nation's capital early next year taking part in a program designed to give young people a close-up introduction to how the federal government works.
As a Presidential Classroom participant, she will attend seminars led by officials from each of the three branches of the federal government, the military, the media and other centers of power. With other students from throughout the United States and abroad, she'll get to take part in small-group workshops, tour the White House, attend a CIA briefing, observe congressional meetings and take part in a student mock presidential election.
Cori, the daughter of Catherine and Don Mills, is president of the All Saints Student Government Association, a member of the National Honor Society, and a member of the All Saints girls' varsity volleyball team. She will be in Washington, D.C., from Jan. 26 through Feb. 2.
The not-for-profit Presidential Classroom program, now in its 34th year, is open to high school juniors and seniors who have at least a 3.0 grade-point average on a 4-point system. More than 92,000 high school students from the United States and abroad have taken part in its offerings -- which today include sessions focusing on global business, e-commerce and public policy; media and democracy; science, technology and public policy; and law and justice in a democracy, along with an international Future World Leaders Summit.
The program offers students "a front-row seat" for observing the American political process at work, Jay Wickliff, Presidential Classroom executive director, says. "In learning about the federal government and discussing key issues with Washington policymakers, our presidential scholars graduate with a better understanding of their civic responsibility." To learn more about the program, visit the Presidential Classroom web site.