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DAILY FLIGHTS FROM CHARLOTTE TO RESUME

Nov. 14, 2001 – Come Jan. 6, US Airways will resume daily flights into St. Thomas from its Charlotte, N.C., hub that had been downgraded to weekend service earlier this year and then were halted altogether.
The service is non-stop into St. Thomas. The return flight makes a stop in San Juan.
Gordon Finch, Port Authority executive director, said in a statement issued Wednesday that his agency "is pleased that an airline is increasing instead of decreasing flights, despite the recent terrorist attacks."
Service will be aboard an Airbus 320, which can accommodate 126 passengers in coach and 16 in first class, according to a USAir sales agent. The flight, No. 1480, is scheduled to depart Charlotte at 11:15 a.m. and arrive at Cyil E. King Airport at 3:45 p.m. It is to leave St. Thomas at 4:50 p.m., make the intermediate stop in San Juan and arrive in Charlotte at 9:20 p.m.
The airline currently has a daily flight out of Philadelphia into St. Thomas which connects to St. Croix before the return north.
Finch said USAir's decision to resume the second daily flight "is very encouraging and sheds an optimistic light on the future of our economy."
USAir operates out of three hubs — Charlotte, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh — and serves 17 Caribbean destinations. Its most recent addition, initiated Nov. 10, is weekend service between Charlotte and Aruba that also is to be expanded to daily flights in January.
According to the sales agent, there are no special introductory fares for the Charlotte-St. Thomas flight. For further information, call 1-800-428-4322 or visit the USAir web site.

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Nov. 14, 2001 - Come Jan. 6, US Airways will resume daily flights into St. Thomas from its Charlotte, N.C., hub that had been downgraded to weekend service earlier this year and then were halted altogether.
The service is non-stop into St. Thomas. The return flight makes a stop in San Juan.
Gordon Finch, Port Authority executive director, said in a statement issued Wednesday that his agency "is pleased that an airline is increasing instead of decreasing flights, despite the recent terrorist attacks."
Service will be aboard an Airbus 320, which can accommodate 126 passengers in coach and 16 in first class, according to a USAir sales agent. The flight, No. 1480, is scheduled to depart Charlotte at 11:15 a.m. and arrive at Cyil E. King Airport at 3:45 p.m. It is to leave St. Thomas at 4:50 p.m., make the intermediate stop in San Juan and arrive in Charlotte at 9:20 p.m.
The airline currently has a daily flight out of Philadelphia into St. Thomas which connects to St. Croix before the return north.
Finch said USAir's decision to resume the second daily flight "is very encouraging and sheds an optimistic light on the future of our economy."
USAir operates out of three hubs -- Charlotte, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh -- and serves 17 Caribbean destinations. Its most recent addition, initiated Nov. 10, is weekend service between Charlotte and Aruba that also is to be expanded to daily flights in January.
According to the sales agent, there are no special introductory fares for the Charlotte-St. Thomas flight. For further information, call 1-800-428-4322 or visit the USAir web site.