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STAY AT HOME, DON'T TRICK-OR-TREAT, SAY POLICE

Oct. 17, 2001 – The Police Department suggests that Halloween this year be "a night for family fun."
Halloween is of particular concern to the Police Department, given the nature of activities that generally take place, a release states. Police Commissioner Franz Christian encourages parents to be careful and select wholesome activities for their children.
Further, no child should be allowed on the streets alone during this period.
"I encourage children and adults alike to stay indoors and opt for family activities instead of trick-or-treating," Christian said. "This would be a great time to enjoy the family by telling stories, making treats indoors or even watching videos."
Deputy Chief Theodore Carty, in a separate release, reminds parents that the curfew law is being enforced by the Juvenile Bureau, and thus children are advised to carry identification at all times. Curfew begins at 10 p.m. for minors ages 16 and under who are not accompanied by an adult.
"We are stepping up on juvenile activity as it relates to parental neglect," Carty said.
Christian also said police will crack down on those who try to "turn Halloween into 'Devil's Day' through criminal activity." Police patrols will "saturate the territory" to prevent tragedies and crimes, he said.
For those who still insist on going out, Christian offered these tips:
— Wear reflective clothing and carry flashlights.
— Children should be accompanied by adults at all times.
— Go trick-or-treating earlier, before it gets dark.
— Visit only homes of friends or family members within your neighborhood.
— Choose reasonable costumes, preferably without masks, and do not wear stocking caps or ski masks.
— Parents should check all candies before children eat them.

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Oct. 17, 2001 – The Police Department suggests that Halloween this year be "a night for family fun."
Halloween is of particular concern to the Police Department, given the nature of activities that generally take place, a release states. Police Commissioner Franz Christian encourages parents to be careful and select wholesome activities for their children.
Further, no child should be allowed on the streets alone during this period.
"I encourage children and adults alike to stay indoors and opt for family activities instead of trick-or-treating," Christian said. "This would be a great time to enjoy the family by telling stories, making treats indoors or even watching videos."
Deputy Chief Theodore Carty, in a separate release, reminds parents that the curfew law is being enforced by the Juvenile Bureau, and thus children are advised to carry identification at all times. Curfew begins at 10 p.m. for minors ages 16 and under who are not accompanied by an adult.
"We are stepping up on juvenile activity as it relates to parental neglect," Carty said.
Christian also said police will crack down on those who try to "turn Halloween into 'Devil's Day' through criminal activity." Police patrols will "saturate the territory" to prevent tragedies and crimes, he said.
For those who still insist on going out, Christian offered these tips:
-- Wear reflective clothing and carry flashlights.
-- Children should be accompanied by adults at all times.
-- Go trick-or-treating earlier, before it gets dark.
-- Visit only homes of friends or family members within your neighborhood.
-- Choose reasonable costumes, preferably without masks, and do not wear stocking caps or ski masks.
-- Parents should check all candies before children eat them.