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ALONG CAME A SPIDER – WEAVING LOONY WEBS

May 13, 2001 — "Along Came a Spider," and along came Washington, D.C. homicide detective Alex Cross (Morgan Freeman) right behind him, having had four years to recover from his rigorous debut as detective Cross in 1997's "Kiss the Girls."
Both movies are based on books by the canny crime writer, James Patterson. The illustrious and highly intelligent Cross is a detective sought after by the most illustrious and intelligent criminals, in this case a schizophrenic psychopath who wants to top the "Crime of the Century," the Lindbergh baby kidnaping of the 1930's.
Pursuing this somewhat skewed ambition, the kidnapper (Michael Wincott) absconds with the daughter of a senator (Mika Boorem) from an exclusive Washington prep school for children of the rich and powerful. He then secretes her on a moored boat.
Enter Freeman, accompanied by Jezzie (Monica Potter), Mika's Secret Service guardian. The kidnapper is a master of disguises, some, the critics say, looking like he is in high drag, while he throws Cross a number of curves, trying to keep him at bay.
However, whoa! – Cross is no ordinary gumshoe, and Freeman is no ordinary actor. His forceful performance overcomes what come critics have called "loony and absurd plot twists" on the way to set things straight, and rescue the damsel in the boat.
Freeman, an avid sailor, is familiar to many Virgin Islanders. His portrait has been painted by local artist Eunice Summer, and he has been seen having coffee more than once at a popular Frenchtown spot.
The movie was directed by Lee Tamahori, and is rated R for violence and language. It's an hour and 45 minutes long.
It is playing at Market Square East.

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May 13, 2001 -- "Along Came a Spider," and along came Washington, D.C. homicide detective Alex Cross (Morgan Freeman) right behind him, having had four years to recover from his rigorous debut as detective Cross in 1997's "Kiss the Girls."
Both movies are based on books by the canny crime writer, James Patterson. The illustrious and highly intelligent Cross is a detective sought after by the most illustrious and intelligent criminals, in this case a schizophrenic psychopath who wants to top the "Crime of the Century," the Lindbergh baby kidnaping of the 1930's.
Pursuing this somewhat skewed ambition, the kidnapper (Michael Wincott) absconds with the daughter of a senator (Mika Boorem) from an exclusive Washington prep school for children of the rich and powerful. He then secretes her on a moored boat.
Enter Freeman, accompanied by Jezzie (Monica Potter), Mika's Secret Service guardian. The kidnapper is a master of disguises, some, the critics say, looking like he is in high drag, while he throws Cross a number of curves, trying to keep him at bay.
However, whoa! – Cross is no ordinary gumshoe, and Freeman is no ordinary actor. His forceful performance overcomes what come critics have called "loony and absurd plot twists" on the way to set things straight, and rescue the damsel in the boat.
Freeman, an avid sailor, is familiar to many Virgin Islanders. His portrait has been painted by local artist Eunice Summer, and he has been seen having coffee more than once at a popular Frenchtown spot.
The movie was directed by Lee Tamahori, and is rated R for violence and language. It's an hour and 45 minutes long.
It is playing at Market Square East.