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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, July 5, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesHANNIBAL -- RETURN OF THE CANNIBAL

HANNIBAL — RETURN OF THE CANNIBAL

It's been 10 years, and just like really bad clockwork, Hannibal Lecter is back. He's had time to hone his macabre skills, which he, unfortunately by all counts, demonstrates in "Hannibal."
Jodie Foster, who engaged one and all in her performance as the young FBI agent Clarice Starling in "Silence of the Lambs," is replaced here by Julianne Moore, but Lecter is once and for all time, Anthony Hopkins, the role which won him an Oscar.
This adaptation of Thomas Harris' latest Hannibal novel, finds Lecter living in Florence these past years, but Italy has not made him forget agent Starling, who certainly has not forgotten Lecter. Lecter has been tauntingly in touch with Starling over the years.
Starling has been engaged by the only living survivor of Lecter's assaults to hunt him down, once again. In some sort of trouble with her higher ups at the FBI, Starling knows she has to make good.
That's the basic story, but the critics warn the faint of heart to stay home. One normally middle- of-the-road sort, in fact, calls it "a sickening journey through Lecter's violent, cannibalistic mind." Director Ridley Scott, of the Academy Award nominated "Gladiator," is credited with not making the film as "exploitative as it might have been in less restrained hands." One wonders, after the lurid descriptions, just how restrained those hands were.
"Silence of the Lambs" is a tough act to follow, and "Hannibal" is said not to have the psychological impact of the original. Hopkins has said this Lecter is "a bit tongue in cheek, and more outrageous."
Ray Liotta, who plays a corrupt Justice Dept. official, says the first movie was "in your head; the new one is in your face." Steve Zaillian screen adaptation of the Harris novel while reportedly pretty grisly, is said to contain more humorous moments than the original. Basically, however, they might just provide some comic relief in the two hour and 10 minute flick.
On a more reassuring note, Oscar winner Jeremy Irons has said of the movie, "Remember it's only a movie, and if it is very gory, so are some of the Greek tragedies — eating their sons baked in pies, cutting out eyes." Whatever.
The movie is rated R for strong gruesome violence, some nudity and language.
It is starts Thursday at Cinema One.

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It's been 10 years, and just like really bad clockwork, Hannibal Lecter is back. He's had time to hone his macabre skills, which he, unfortunately by all counts, demonstrates in "Hannibal."
Jodie Foster, who engaged one and all in her performance as the young FBI agent Clarice Starling in "Silence of the Lambs," is replaced here by Julianne Moore, but Lecter is once and for all time, Anthony Hopkins, the role which won him an Oscar.
This adaptation of Thomas Harris' latest Hannibal novel, finds Lecter living in Florence these past years, but Italy has not made him forget agent Starling, who certainly has not forgotten Lecter. Lecter has been tauntingly in touch with Starling over the years.
Starling has been engaged by the only living survivor of Lecter's assaults to hunt him down, once again. In some sort of trouble with her higher ups at the FBI, Starling knows she has to make good.
That's the basic story, but the critics warn the faint of heart to stay home. One normally middle- of-the-road sort, in fact, calls it "a sickening journey through Lecter's violent, cannibalistic mind." Director Ridley Scott, of the Academy Award nominated "Gladiator," is credited with not making the film as "exploitative as it might have been in less restrained hands." One wonders, after the lurid descriptions, just how restrained those hands were.
"Silence of the Lambs" is a tough act to follow, and "Hannibal" is said not to have the psychological impact of the original. Hopkins has said this Lecter is "a bit tongue in cheek, and more outrageous."
Ray Liotta, who plays a corrupt Justice Dept. official, says the first movie was "in your head; the new one is in your face." Steve Zaillian screen adaptation of the Harris novel while reportedly pretty grisly, is said to contain more humorous moments than the original. Basically, however, they might just provide some comic relief in the two hour and 10 minute flick.
On a more reassuring note, Oscar winner Jeremy Irons has said of the movie, "Remember it's only a movie, and if it is very gory, so are some of the Greek tragedies -- eating their sons baked in pies, cutting out eyes." Whatever.
The movie is rated R for strong gruesome violence, some nudity and language.
It is starts Thursday at Cinema One.