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NOW A TROPICAL WAVE, JOYCE FALLS APART

From tropical wave to tropical depression and storm to hurricane and back again, Joyce has fallen apart and is back at square one in intensity, according to the National Hurricane Center.
At 11 a.m. Monday, forecaster Richard Pasch said that "air force reconnaissance, surface observations and visible satellite images indicate that Joyce's low-level circulation is dissipating and the system is essentially an open wave. The system will be monitored for signs of regeneration as it tracks westward over the Southern Caribbean."
What was left of the disturbance's center, Pasch said, was at around 12 degrees north latitude, 67.5 degrees west longitude, or about 55 miles east of the island of Bonaire late Monday morning. He expected the wave to move in a generally westward direction at 20 to 25 miles per hour, bringing rain showers and some strong gusty winds of near 35 miles per hour with it.
The 11 a.m. advisory will be the last on Joyce unless it begins to build again, according to the center.

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From tropical wave to tropical depression and storm to hurricane and back again, Joyce has fallen apart and is back at square one in intensity, according to the National Hurricane Center.
At 11 a.m. Monday, forecaster Richard Pasch said that "air force reconnaissance, surface observations and visible satellite images indicate that Joyce's low-level circulation is dissipating and the system is essentially an open wave. The system will be monitored for signs of regeneration as it tracks westward over the Southern Caribbean."
What was left of the disturbance's center, Pasch said, was at around 12 degrees north latitude, 67.5 degrees west longitude, or about 55 miles east of the island of Bonaire late Monday morning. He expected the wave to move in a generally westward direction at 20 to 25 miles per hour, bringing rain showers and some strong gusty winds of near 35 miles per hour with it.
The 11 a.m. advisory will be the last on Joyce unless it begins to build again, according to the center.