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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, June 28, 2022
HomeNewsArchives'BIG MOMMA' FOLLOWS THE TRADITION OF 'TOOTSIE'

'BIG MOMMA' FOLLOWS THE TRADITION OF 'TOOTSIE'

Following what looks to be a once-every-five-years or so tradition, "Big Momma's House" is this year's contribution to the man-disguised-as-woman comedy genre. Not the wonderful fun of "Priscilla Queen of the Desert" — an Australian bus ride loaded with transvestites, nor Dustin Hoffman's "Tootsie," nor even Robin Williams' "Mrs. Doubtfire," "Big Momma" stands alone.
And she, in the person of Malcolm Turner (Martin Lawrence), stands staunchly in the deep South, cookin' soul food, birthin' babies and even "testifying" at church. What has brought Turner to this pitiable state is his job. He is an FBI agent.
Tough, smart Turner, who is also a master of disguise, meets his match in "Big Momma." In his first scenes in the film, he portrays an aged Asian man cracking a brutal crime ring. Piece of cake. But "Big Momma" is another matter.
He is sent to a small Southern town to trap a vicious bank robber recently escaped from prison. He sets up a stakeout across from the home of the town patriarch — "B.M.," natch, who supposedly is expecting the robber's former flame, Sherry (Nia Long), and her son. But, wouldn't you know, "B.M." has suddenly split town, so Turner has no choice but to take on her role.
Sherry arrives, and Turner/"B.M." thinks she is neater than fried mush. Wow, the plot thickens . . . Can a cantankerous southern granny provoke a sweet young thing to fall for him/her? Well, slap my grits, ya' got me!
The movie is directed by Raja Gosnell. It is rated PG-13 for crude humor, sexual innuendo (no. . .), language and some violence. It is playing at Market Square East and Cinema One.

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Following what looks to be a once-every-five-years or so tradition, "Big Momma's House" is this year's contribution to the man-disguised-as-woman comedy genre. Not the wonderful fun of "Priscilla Queen of the Desert" -- an Australian bus ride loaded with transvestites, nor Dustin Hoffman's "Tootsie," nor even Robin Williams' "Mrs. Doubtfire," "Big Momma" stands alone.
And she, in the person of Malcolm Turner (Martin Lawrence), stands staunchly in the deep South, cookin' soul food, birthin' babies and even "testifying" at church. What has brought Turner to this pitiable state is his job. He is an FBI agent.
Tough, smart Turner, who is also a master of disguise, meets his match in "Big Momma." In his first scenes in the film, he portrays an aged Asian man cracking a brutal crime ring. Piece of cake. But "Big Momma" is another matter.
He is sent to a small Southern town to trap a vicious bank robber recently escaped from prison. He sets up a stakeout across from the home of the town patriarch -- "B.M.," natch, who supposedly is expecting the robber's former flame, Sherry (Nia Long), and her son. But, wouldn't you know, "B.M." has suddenly split town, so Turner has no choice but to take on her role.
Sherry arrives, and Turner/"B.M." thinks she is neater than fried mush. Wow, the plot thickens . . . Can a cantankerous southern granny provoke a sweet young thing to fall for him/her? Well, slap my grits, ya' got me!
The movie is directed by Raja Gosnell. It is rated PG-13 for crude humor, sexual innuendo (no. . .), language and some violence. It is playing at Market Square East and Cinema One.