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HomeNewsArchivesFRIENDS GATHER TO REMEMBER CARTER HAGUE

FRIENDS GATHER TO REMEMBER CARTER HAGUE

A wealth of friends and former colleagues gathered Saturday afternoon at Hook, Line and Sinker in Frenchtown to bid goodbye to Carter Hague, for 30 years a unique voice in Virgin Islands journalism, radio and other less-restrictive venues.
Sounds of laughter rang out intermittently in the sunny outside gathering as friends gave tributes, spiced with lively anecdotes, about Hague, whose wit was widely known. Friends, as requested, brought "good stories and warm memories."
Tributes from San Francisco, Florida and Washington, D.C., were read by Brooks Brown and Courtney Gabrielson, who hosted the afternoon. The familiar voice of Nicky Russell provided a fitting local backdrop.
Former UVI journalism professor Frank Jordan expressed his respect for Hague's "rapier wit" and journalistic skill, to say nothing of his "ad-libs" on air. Two former colleagues, radio personality Rick Ricardo and journalist John Thompson, sent warm remembrances.
Derryle Berger, in a message to her "best friend of 30 years," said "everything was always more fun and interesting" when Hague was around. This sentiment was amply backed up by a number of people, including the staff of Alexander's Cafe where Hague was a regular for many years.
Linda Pinson, Hague's longtime companion, asked Pat Adams to read some words about Hague's life in his native Texas and on St. Thomas, where, Adams said, his "humor and dignity" will always be remembered.
The sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, remembrances included a mix of old St. Thomas, including Henry Wheatley, Marge Kalik, Pat and Alton Adams, Eric Matthews, Dianne Brinker, Jim and Gayle Armour and Sharon Bryan and her daughter, Holly.
Hague was best known in the community as news director and commentator for years at WVWI Radio. He earlier was a reporter and editor at The Daily News and a publicist for the former V.I. Commerce Department.

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A wealth of friends and former colleagues gathered Saturday afternoon at Hook, Line and Sinker in Frenchtown to bid goodbye to Carter Hague, for 30 years a unique voice in Virgin Islands journalism, radio and other less-restrictive venues.
Sounds of laughter rang out intermittently in the sunny outside gathering as friends gave tributes, spiced with lively anecdotes, about Hague, whose wit was widely known. Friends, as requested, brought "good stories and warm memories."
Tributes from San Francisco, Florida and Washington, D.C., were read by Brooks Brown and Courtney Gabrielson, who hosted the afternoon. The familiar voice of Nicky Russell provided a fitting local backdrop.
Former UVI journalism professor Frank Jordan expressed his respect for Hague's "rapier wit" and journalistic skill, to say nothing of his "ad-libs" on air. Two former colleagues, radio personality Rick Ricardo and journalist John Thompson, sent warm remembrances.
Derryle Berger, in a message to her "best friend of 30 years," said "everything was always more fun and interesting" when Hague was around. This sentiment was amply backed up by a number of people, including the staff of Alexander's Cafe where Hague was a regular for many years.
Linda Pinson, Hague's longtime companion, asked Pat Adams to read some words about Hague's life in his native Texas and on St. Thomas, where, Adams said, his "humor and dignity" will always be remembered.
The sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, remembrances included a mix of old St. Thomas, including Henry Wheatley, Marge Kalik, Pat and Alton Adams, Eric Matthews, Dianne Brinker, Jim and Gayle Armour and Sharon Bryan and her daughter, Holly.
Hague was best known in the community as news director and commentator for years at WVWI Radio. He earlier was a reporter and editor at The Daily News and a publicist for the former V.I. Commerce Department.