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Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, May 26, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesUVI TEAM AT SEA CONDUCTING MARINE RESEARCH

UVI TEAM AT SEA CONDUCTING MARINE RESEARCH

When the oceanographic research vessel Seward Johnson comes into the St. Thomas harbor on Sunday, it will be returning four students and three faculty and staff members of the University of the Virgin Islands from a week-long scientific expedition at sea.
Departing from Trinidad and making their way back to the Virgin Islands, they are studying aspects of the intermingling of Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea waters as part of ongoing research called the Anagada Climate Tracers Study, or ACTS.
The UVI participants are students Jack DeVan, Brandon Eyre, Michael Holt and Barry Volson; marine biology professor Stephen Ratchford, marine research specialist Kevin Brown and Water Resources Research Institute staff member Ronald Olivacce. Four years ago, Olivacce was the first UVI student intern to take part in the program. Holt is the first female student to go to sea under the ACTS program.
This is the 10th shipboard study conducted under the ACTS program, which is gathering data on the flow and exchange of climatically important substances between the two bodies of water. Funding for the research is from the U.S. Energy Department and UVI's Eastern Caribbean Center. Conducted as a joint exercise with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the expedition is taking measurements in each of the major passages of water between the islands of the Eastern Caribbean. UVI is conducting a study that focuses on the Anegada Passage.
The next, and perhaps last, ACTS expedition for this year will take place in June. Marine science students interested in helping to conduct scientific research on that trip can call 693-1391 or check out the website www.uvi.edu/ECC/ACTS.htm.

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When the oceanographic research vessel Seward Johnson comes into the St. Thomas harbor on Sunday, it will be returning four students and three faculty and staff members of the University of the Virgin Islands from a week-long scientific expedition at sea.
Departing from Trinidad and making their way back to the Virgin Islands, they are studying aspects of the intermingling of Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea waters as part of ongoing research called the Anagada Climate Tracers Study, or ACTS.
The UVI participants are students Jack DeVan, Brandon Eyre, Michael Holt and Barry Volson; marine biology professor Stephen Ratchford, marine research specialist Kevin Brown and Water Resources Research Institute staff member Ronald Olivacce. Four years ago, Olivacce was the first UVI student intern to take part in the program. Holt is the first female student to go to sea under the ACTS program.
This is the 10th shipboard study conducted under the ACTS program, which is gathering data on the flow and exchange of climatically important substances between the two bodies of water. Funding for the research is from the U.S. Energy Department and UVI's Eastern Caribbean Center. Conducted as a joint exercise with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the expedition is taking measurements in each of the major passages of water between the islands of the Eastern Caribbean. UVI is conducting a study that focuses on the Anegada Passage.
The next, and perhaps last, ACTS expedition for this year will take place in June. Marine science students interested in helping to conduct scientific research on that trip can call 693-1391 or check out the website www.uvi.edu/ECC/ACTS.htm.