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Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, May 29, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesKEYS FOR DOG BITE PREVENTION

KEYS FOR DOG BITE PREVENTION

Though some dogs are more likely to bite, any dog can bite and inflict injury. According to the Humane Society of the United States, 13,000 Americans are bitten by dogs every day. Children account for sixty percent of all dog bites, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates half of all children 12 and younger have been bitten by a dog.
There are some steps that can be taken by both dog owners and potential victims to prevent dog bites. New dog owners should carefully select their new pet. Some dog breeds are naturally more aggressive and protective than other breeds. The new pet should also be well socialized. Puppies that are exposed to new people and new situations are more confident and less likely to bite out of fear.
A well-trained pet is also less likely to bite. Training your dog to obey "sit", "stay" "down" and "come" can help avert dangerous scenarios. Having the pet on a leash also increases your level of control. Although your dog may be friendly, other dogs may trigger a confrontation and having control of your pet can avert trouble.
Neutered and spayed dogs are less likely to bite. Sexual hormones contribute to aggression, and removing the source of these hormones results in a calmer more stable personality.
Parents should teach children about animals at an early age. A baby or small child should NEVER be left alone with a dog, even the trusted family dog, even for a minute. Children should be taught not to approach strange dogs and ask permission before petting the dog.
When a dog approaches you, stand still and let him sniff you. Sudden movements and loud noises, like screaming, can trigger an excited and potentially aggressive response. Avoid eye contact with the dog. Dogs perceive this as an act of aggression.
The best way to get away from a dog is to back away slowly. If you turn and run, the dog is likely to give chase. If you fall or are knocked down, curl into a ball with your hands over your head and face. Most dogs recognize this as a sign of submission and back off.
Dogs are wonderful family members and with responsible ownership the incidence of dog bites can be reduced. If you are bitten by a dog, you should seek medical attention and inform the authorities.
Editor's note: Dr. Laura Palminteri Practices veterinary medicine at Cruz Bay Canines, Cats & Critters on St. John. A 1991 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, she practiced small animal and equine medicine in New York before opening her practice on St. John.

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Though some dogs are more likely to bite, any dog can bite and inflict injury. According to the Humane Society of the United States, 13,000 Americans are bitten by dogs every day. Children account for sixty percent of all dog bites, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates half of all children 12 and younger have been bitten by a dog.
There are some steps that can be taken by both dog owners and potential victims to prevent dog bites. New dog owners should carefully select their new pet. Some dog breeds are naturally more aggressive and protective than other breeds. The new pet should also be well socialized. Puppies that are exposed to new people and new situations are more confident and less likely to bite out of fear.
A well-trained pet is also less likely to bite. Training your dog to obey "sit", "stay" "down" and "come" can help avert dangerous scenarios. Having the pet on a leash also increases your level of control. Although your dog may be friendly, other dogs may trigger a confrontation and having control of your pet can avert trouble.
Neutered and spayed dogs are less likely to bite. Sexual hormones contribute to aggression, and removing the source of these hormones results in a calmer more stable personality.
Parents should teach children about animals at an early age. A baby or small child should NEVER be left alone with a dog, even the trusted family dog, even for a minute. Children should be taught not to approach strange dogs and ask permission before petting the dog.
When a dog approaches you, stand still and let him sniff you. Sudden movements and loud noises, like screaming, can trigger an excited and potentially aggressive response. Avoid eye contact with the dog. Dogs perceive this as an act of aggression.
The best way to get away from a dog is to back away slowly. If you turn and run, the dog is likely to give chase. If you fall or are knocked down, curl into a ball with your hands over your head and face. Most dogs recognize this as a sign of submission and back off.
Dogs are wonderful family members and with responsible ownership the incidence of dog bites can be reduced. If you are bitten by a dog, you should seek medical attention and inform the authorities.
Editor's note: Dr. Laura Palminteri Practices veterinary medicine at Cruz Bay Canines, Cats & Critters on St. John. A 1991 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, she practiced small animal and equine medicine in New York before opening her practice on St. John.