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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, August 9, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesDAUGHTER OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS CREATES ART THAT REFLECTS HER BACKGROUND

DAUGHTER OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS CREATES ART THAT REFLECTS HER BACKGROUND

Corinne Innis, born in New York city, was brought to the Virgin Islands as a baby.
"My first memories are of St. John," Innis said recently in an interview with St. Thomas Source.
She refers to herself as an Afro-Caribbean Artist.
Corinne believes that art is reflective of wherever you come from.
Her work, which is full of bold colors and expressive facial features, has been shown as part of an exhibit entitled "Women From Far Away." The exhibit showcased the work of women from places such as Ethiopia, and Chili.
Since then Innis has shown her work as a participant in Pro Arts and the Art of Living Black Open Studios.
One of her pieces — "potted plant" — a three dimensional live plant in a pot, was chosen to be part of Pro Arts' juried exhibition.
Out of 719 works "potted plant" was one of 12 works selected to be in their yearly calendar.
In January "Orixa and Her Disciples" and "Three Sisters With Boat" were selected to be in the exhibit — "What We Think of Ourselves" — at the Center for Visual Art in Oakland.
Innis works in a variety of mediums.
She would like to see her work translated to designs on album covers and shower curtains or mouse pads.
"I think many artists don't think art should be a business," she said.
"I want to have more functional use for my work. Instead of waiting to sell originals, I want to sell the images."
Innis has already come up with mouse pads and other items that carry her images and is working on new ideas all the time.
"There are a million things that need images. The Kleenex box needs an image," she said.
For a further glimpse at Innis' images click here.

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Corinne Innis, born in New York city, was brought to the Virgin Islands as a baby.
"My first memories are of St. John," Innis said recently in an interview with St. Thomas Source.
She refers to herself as an Afro-Caribbean Artist.
Corinne believes that art is reflective of wherever you come from.
Her work, which is full of bold colors and expressive facial features, has been shown as part of an exhibit entitled "Women From Far Away." The exhibit showcased the work of women from places such as Ethiopia, and Chili.
Since then Innis has shown her work as a participant in Pro Arts and the Art of Living Black Open Studios.
One of her pieces — "potted plant" — a three dimensional live plant in a pot, was chosen to be part of Pro Arts' juried exhibition.
Out of 719 works "potted plant" was one of 12 works selected to be in their yearly calendar.
In January "Orixa and Her Disciples" and "Three Sisters With Boat" were selected to be in the exhibit — "What We Think of Ourselves" — at the Center for Visual Art in Oakland.
Innis works in a variety of mediums.
She would like to see her work translated to designs on album covers and shower curtains or mouse pads.
"I think many artists don't think art should be a business," she said.
"I want to have more functional use for my work. Instead of waiting to sell originals, I want to sell the images."
Innis has already come up with mouse pads and other items that carry her images and is working on new ideas all the time.
"There are a million things that need images. The Kleenex box needs an image," she said.
For a further glimpse at Innis' images click here.