80.3 F
Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, August 18, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesSCHOOLS OF HORROR

SCHOOLS OF HORROR

Littleton, Co. was a blow to a wounded nation. It told us once again to take the issue of teen violence seriously. The teen violence epidemic has swallowed the United States whole. In the past year, thousands of families and friends have mourned the loss of loved ones. Millions watched CNN's live coverage of memorial services, President Clinton's responses, MTV's "Take a stand against Violence" Campaign, etc. But where does it stop? What Causes these children to commit these heinous crimes? Worse yet, why aren't people hearing their cries for help?
Who would have suspected that two boys from Jonesboro, Ark., ages eleven and thirteen, would take revenge on a whole school over such a silly thing as girlfriends dumping them? Well, it happened. The boys easily, too easily, acquired arms from a family member's gun cabinet and proceeded to ambush the school. What child makes a mass murder plot on such a high level? Well, schools across the country are rushing to find a cause for these tragic incidents. Who can control and stop these massacres from happening? Only one type of person comes to mind. A good parent. Parents don't realize the effect they have on their teens' lives. There is a saying, "Your child is listening. Are you talking?"
Parental involvement in most adolescents' lives is usually not enough. People say, one can watch tv with one's child twenty-three hours of the day, but what about the twenty-fourth hour? Well, if during the times one spends with one's child, one teaches him the difference between reality and entertainment, after a couple of times it will stick. It won't stop their child from watching inappropriate things but it will make a big difference on how much tv affects their child. Spending time with children is one way of being involved. Another is being open and easy to talk to. This will get a child to be more truthful about his plans, friends, and relationships. By showing children that their parents care, parents learn more about their kids. In truth, teens aren't really as complicated as many believe.
The issue of preventing violence on campus is another issue, yet to be dealt with. Many schools are instituting new ways of violence prevention. Many schools are making stricter policies, so that youths have more reasons not to commit crimes. Other schools are having conventions and fairs to promote other outlets for anger, such as sports and the arts. Nationwide, more and more people are listening to their children. People are hearing their cries for help. Those that can't help their children seek help for them. Campus violence has risen to a new level. It is the job of parents, teachers, principals, peers, communities etc. to make sure that this problem is fixed as soon as possible,
Children are young adults waiting to grow and acquire knowledge. This is all right but the communities of America must make sure this knowledge is accurate and appropriate. Whether it be parents or teachers, brothers or sisters, somebody should be stepping into the children's lives and making sure that they all get the help that is needed. No longer can we allow tears to flow from the faces of the innocent bystanders, blood shed of those who meant no harm, and bullets from the guns of those who will live to regret it. These incidents are not fair to students, victims, and the families of the "gun children." Let there never be a day again when a young woman's mother must accept her valedictorian's diploma; let there never be another day in which parents receive a heart wrenching phone call from the emergency room; let there never be a child who is not heard.
Editor's Note: Corinne M. L. Mills is an eighth grade, National Junior Honor Society student at Antilles School and wrote this essay as a school assignment. She is the daughter of Catherine and Don C. Mills

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Littleton, Co. was a blow to a wounded nation. It told us once again to take the issue of teen violence seriously. The teen violence epidemic has swallowed the United States whole. In the past year, thousands of families and friends have mourned the loss of loved ones. Millions watched CNN's live coverage of memorial services, President Clinton's responses, MTV's "Take a stand against Violence" Campaign, etc. But where does it stop? What Causes these children to commit these heinous crimes? Worse yet, why aren't people hearing their cries for help?
Who would have suspected that two boys from Jonesboro, Ark., ages eleven and thirteen, would take revenge on a whole school over such a silly thing as girlfriends dumping them? Well, it happened. The boys easily, too easily, acquired arms from a family member's gun cabinet and proceeded to ambush the school. What child makes a mass murder plot on such a high level? Well, schools across the country are rushing to find a cause for these tragic incidents. Who can control and stop these massacres from happening? Only one type of person comes to mind. A good parent. Parents don't realize the effect they have on their teens' lives. There is a saying, "Your child is listening. Are you talking?"
Parental involvement in most adolescents' lives is usually not enough. People say, one can watch tv with one's child twenty-three hours of the day, but what about the twenty-fourth hour? Well, if during the times one spends with one's child, one teaches him the difference between reality and entertainment, after a couple of times it will stick. It won't stop their child from watching inappropriate things but it will make a big difference on how much tv affects their child. Spending time with children is one way of being involved. Another is being open and easy to talk to. This will get a child to be more truthful about his plans, friends, and relationships. By showing children that their parents care, parents learn more about their kids. In truth, teens aren't really as complicated as many believe.
The issue of preventing violence on campus is another issue, yet to be dealt with. Many schools are instituting new ways of violence prevention. Many schools are making stricter policies, so that youths have more reasons not to commit crimes. Other schools are having conventions and fairs to promote other outlets for anger, such as sports and the arts. Nationwide, more and more people are listening to their children. People are hearing their cries for help. Those that can't help their children seek help for them. Campus violence has risen to a new level. It is the job of parents, teachers, principals, peers, communities etc. to make sure that this problem is fixed as soon as possible,
Children are young adults waiting to grow and acquire knowledge. This is all right but the communities of America must make sure this knowledge is accurate and appropriate. Whether it be parents or teachers, brothers or sisters, somebody should be stepping into the children's lives and making sure that they all get the help that is needed. No longer can we allow tears to flow from the faces of the innocent bystanders, blood shed of those who meant no harm, and bullets from the guns of those who will live to regret it. These incidents are not fair to students, victims, and the families of the "gun children." Let there never be a day again when a young woman's mother must accept her valedictorian's diploma; let there never be another day in which parents receive a heart wrenching phone call from the emergency room; let there never be a child who is not heard.
Editor's Note: Corinne M. L. Mills is an eighth grade, National Junior Honor Society student at Antilles School and wrote this essay as a school assignment. She is the daughter of Catherine and Don C. Mills