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Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, August 18, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesPISTARCKLE'S ‘SYLVIA' -- A HOWLING ROMP

PISTARCKLE'S ‘SYLVIA' — A HOWLING ROMP

"It's a Dog's life," better known as "Sylvia," opened at Coral World last night to an enthusiastic crowd. The Pistarkle Theater's first production of the year got off to a howling start despite cautions by director Anni Stokes that this was the ensemble's first presentation with lights and sound.
The story involves a middle-aged couple who have uprooted themselves from the suburbs to move to the city and "explore" new options now that their family is raised. Kate, the wife, opts for teaching Shakespeare in Harlem schools – a modest ambition – and husband Greg takes a walk in Central park and finds a dog, Sylvia by name. And therein lies a tale. Or tail.
With the scenes punctuated by Kate's Shakespearian asides, the three principal actors merrily romp around the stage wrapped up in their dilemma. Greg loves Sylvia. Kate hates Sylvia. Sylvia loves Greg.
The "Sylvia" playbill mentions that Priscilla Hintz, "Sylvia," has "always been fond of the performing arts." Whoa – hellooo, fond of? That cannot possibly describe the antics of Hintz as she romps, tumbles, flirts, and generally creates mayhem for almost two hours.
Nicola Emerich as Kate and Randall Doty as Greg nobly fulfill their roles dealing with Greg's Sylvia obsession, as they roll off couches, confront on all fours, and generally, cavort. Ultimately, a marriage counselor, beautifully portrayed by Carol Moore, is called in to referee. Guess who wins?
Regina Husbands is wonderful as the slightly alcoholic uptown friend, and Jay Cormier brings his own humor to the role of Greg's park confrere. This is Cormier's acting debut.
The first act lasts about and hour and twenty minutes, and the last about twenty minutes. I wonder why.
Music artfully threads its way throughout the comedy, providing more than a little irony. And more irony is provided by Kate's definitely non-Shakespearian last aside.
All this is in the gorgeous surroundings of Coral World with the palm trees spiraled in bright lights. Perfect weather. Who could ask for anything more?

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"It's a Dog's life," better known as "Sylvia," opened at Coral World last night to an enthusiastic crowd. The Pistarkle Theater's first production of the year got off to a howling start despite cautions by director Anni Stokes that this was the ensemble's first presentation with lights and sound.
The story involves a middle-aged couple who have uprooted themselves from the suburbs to move to the city and "explore" new options now that their family is raised. Kate, the wife, opts for teaching Shakespeare in Harlem schools – a modest ambition – and husband Greg takes a walk in Central park and finds a dog, Sylvia by name. And therein lies a tale. Or tail.
With the scenes punctuated by Kate's Shakespearian asides, the three principal actors merrily romp around the stage wrapped up in their dilemma. Greg loves Sylvia. Kate hates Sylvia. Sylvia loves Greg.
The "Sylvia" playbill mentions that Priscilla Hintz, "Sylvia," has "always been fond of the performing arts." Whoa – hellooo, fond of? That cannot possibly describe the antics of Hintz as she romps, tumbles, flirts, and generally creates mayhem for almost two hours.
Nicola Emerich as Kate and Randall Doty as Greg nobly fulfill their roles dealing with Greg's Sylvia obsession, as they roll off couches, confront on all fours, and generally, cavort. Ultimately, a marriage counselor, beautifully portrayed by Carol Moore, is called in to referee. Guess who wins?
Regina Husbands is wonderful as the slightly alcoholic uptown friend, and Jay Cormier brings his own humor to the role of Greg's park confrere. This is Cormier's acting debut.
The first act lasts about and hour and twenty minutes, and the last about twenty minutes. I wonder why.
Music artfully threads its way throughout the comedy, providing more than a little irony. And more irony is provided by Kate's definitely non-Shakespearian last aside.
All this is in the gorgeous surroundings of Coral World with the palm trees spiraled in bright lights. Perfect weather. Who could ask for anything more?