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Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, August 17, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesWHERE ARE ALL THOSE FLIES COMING FROM?

WHERE ARE ALL THOSE FLIES COMING FROM?

The mosquitos are bad enough, but are all these flies getting to you?
The onslaught of flies across the island has residents and business owners, especially restaurants, fuming.
"We are fogging one neighborhood at a time, but we can't cover the entire island every day," said Environmental Health Director Laura Hassell. She recommended over-the-counter sprays to kill the flies. Many restaurants are bringing in professional exterminators.
What caused this infestation?
Jozef Keularts, staff entomologist at the University of the Virgin Islands Extension Service, said, "The rains promote lush growth. The damp leaves and vegetable compost, combined with moist animal decay matter, provide an ideal breeding ground for flies."
"We call them phoo-phoo flies," said Rafe Boulon of fish and wildlife, "because of the sounds we make swishing them away."
And lots of people are trying to swish them away.
Ted Luscz, owner of Hook Line and Sinker in Frenchtown, said he visited a restaurant in Amsterdam called the Five Flies, which became famous, "but I don't think that's the case here. We've tried everything — I even hung a plastic bag of water out in back!"
It didn't help.
Betsy Woodward of Caret Bay said her son, Tim, has been spraying around their property
with the vigor of a character out of "Ghostbusters" — but, alas, to no avail.
Craig Barash, owner of Craig and Sally's in Frenchtown, had their driveway power-washed with regular detergents and said it was somewhat better two days later, but "you can't fight nature."
Since they are seasonal, by February or March the flies should disappear. Until next year. But next year can't possibly be as rainy as this, or can it?

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The mosquitos are bad enough, but are all these flies getting to you?
The onslaught of flies across the island has residents and business owners, especially restaurants, fuming.
"We are fogging one neighborhood at a time, but we can't cover the entire island every day," said Environmental Health Director Laura Hassell. She recommended over-the-counter sprays to kill the flies. Many restaurants are bringing in professional exterminators.
What caused this infestation?
Jozef Keularts, staff entomologist at the University of the Virgin Islands Extension Service, said, "The rains promote lush growth. The damp leaves and vegetable compost, combined with moist animal decay matter, provide an ideal breeding ground for flies."
"We call them phoo-phoo flies," said Rafe Boulon of fish and wildlife, "because of the sounds we make swishing them away."
And lots of people are trying to swish them away.
Ted Luscz, owner of Hook Line and Sinker in Frenchtown, said he visited a restaurant in Amsterdam called the Five Flies, which became famous, "but I don't think that's the case here. We've tried everything -- I even hung a plastic bag of water out in back!"
It didn't help.
Betsy Woodward of Caret Bay said her son, Tim, has been spraying around their property
with the vigor of a character out of "Ghostbusters" -- but, alas, to no avail.
Craig Barash, owner of Craig and Sally's in Frenchtown, had their driveway power-washed with regular detergents and said it was somewhat better two days later, but "you can't fight nature."
Since they are seasonal, by February or March the flies should disappear. Until next year. But next year can't possibly be as rainy as this, or can it?